After a patient’s injury or condition has been diagnosed, we will discuss all treatment options. In the event that the severity of the condition and the patient’s individual situation meets the requirements for surgery, the patient will begin their surgical experience at Bellin Orthopedic Surgery Center, in the same building, with their OSMS surgeon.

COMMON PROCEDURES

A knee arthroscopy or “knee scope” is a surgical procedure in which the orthopedic surgeon uses a camera to visualize the internal structure of the knee joint. Through this minimally invasive scope, the surgeon can address cartilage and meniscus damage. Inside the knee joint, there is a medial and lateral meniscus. The meniscus serves to provide shock absorption for the knee joint. When the meniscus is damaged, the surgeon can work to smooth out the damaged area to the meniscus. This is called a meniscectomy.
A shoulder arthroscopy or “shoulder scope” is a surgical procedure in which the orthopedic surgeon uses a camera to visualize the internal structure of the shoulder joint. Through this minimally invasive scope, the surgeon can address cartilage, labral, or rotator cuff tendon damage. A rotator cuff repair is a procedure in which one or more of the rotator cuff muscle tendons are partially or completely torn and the surgeon works to reattach those tendons.
Inside the knee joint, there are four main ligaments that work together to stabilize the knee joint. The most commonly injured ligament is the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The ACL functions to stabilize the knee joint from front to back and is important in “cutting” or “agility” type sports including tennis, basketball, soccer, etc. When the ACL is torn, the orthopedic surgeon can work to repair or remove the damaged ligament and replace it with a new ligament graft that the patient’s body will incorporate. These new ligament grafts are either allografts (donor tissue) or autografts (patient’s own tissue), and our surgeons will help recommend what graft is best for each individual.

A hip arthroscopy or “hip scope” is a surgical procedure in which the orthopedic surgeon uses a camera to visualize the internal structure of the hip joint. Through this minimally invasive scope, the surgeon can address multiple aspects of the hip joint. The labrum is the “cartilage cup” that the head of the femur bone sets in and provides stability and cushion. When the rim of this cup is damaged the orthopedic surgeon can work to repair that surface as well as prevent future issues.

The Achilles tendon is a large tendon that connects your calf muscles to a precise location on the back of the heel. This tendon is used to plantar flex your foot (point your toes and lift your heel). The Achilles is necessary for “push off” when walking, running or jumping. When the Achilles tendon is damaged or torn, an orthopedic surgeon can work to repair or reattach that tendon.
A bunion is a “bony bump” or deformity to the joint at the base of the first or “great” toe. Bunions can cause significant pain, skin irritation and swelling. An orthopedic surgeon can perform a bunionectomy to help remove the bunion and restore normal alignment to the foot.
Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when compression placed on the median nerve in the wrist causes symptoms such as numbness, weakness or pain. Pain may occur in the hand, arm, or fingers. This commonly occurs at night and with certain activities. Through a surgical procedure called a carpal tunnel release, an orthopedic surgeon can release the ligament, which relieves pressure on the nerve and allows it to heal.
When a bone is broken is it called a fracture. Orthopedic surgeons can work to realign the broken bones and secure the bones in place. The goal is to restore proper alignment and stabilize the bone ends to allow healing. This can be accomplished through a variety of surgical techniques including open and minimally invasive methods such as plate and screws, “nailing,” or “pinning”.

Trigger finger is the narrowing around the tendons of a finger or thumb. This causes pain, stiffness and a feeling as if your finger is “locking” or “catching” when you bend and straighten it. Trigger finger release is a surgical procedure to open or release the “tunnel” or pulley the tendon travels through, allowing smooth transit.